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TAG: tonic water
10 Results
Tips & Tricks
Ledger's Cinnamon

Origin Spain
Type Flavoured

Brief description
In the 19th century, quinine was harvested by felling trees, an unsustainable method. The trade of the plants and seeds was also prohibited, and extinction became a real threat. Risking his own life, Charles Ledger, along with his faithful companion, collected seeds of the species Cinchona Ledgeriana, which were sold to the Dutch government, but also spread through India and Indonesia. Charles Ledger gave the world the best of quinines, the only known prophylactic to malaria. Ledger’s Tonic seeks to incorporate all the spirit of adventure and greatness of the personality that inspired it.
The label promises what the nose proves. The cinnamon aroma liberated on opening is dominant and relegate the bitterness of quinine to second place. If there are any doubts, they are dissipated on the first sip where the mature fruit notes and the sweetness of the stevia, almost caramel-like, serve as backup to the ever present cinnamon. The comforting signature of this tonic is further accentuated by the low carbonation and the amber colour, which comes from the cinnamon.
Ledger’s is sold in traditional 200ml bottles The big detail of the label is given to Charles Ledger himself, the inspiration for the tonic. There is also mention of Stevia, a natural sweetener with very few calories.

Advice for use
As a contrast to character Gins, citrus Gins or in warm harmony with aged Gins, just choose any, Ledger’s Cinnamon will always be good company.

Tips & Tricks
San Pellegrino

Origin Italy
Type Neutral

Brief description
Having been produced for 600 years in the springs of San Pellegrino in the Italian Alps, it is currently one of the most famous carbonated waters in the world. Taking advantage of its fame and know how, the company began to produce other soft drinks with their water as a base, adding fruit juices. Only later came their tonic water, despite a phrase that tells another story: “It took many years to reach perfection”.
San Pellegrino Tonic uses the same characteristic bottles as the brands fruit drinks, in the shape of a club, with glass textured like the skin of citrus fruit. The label with its red star and cyan background are reminiscent of the Belle Époque.
San Pellegrino presents an absolute clarity. In repose, it can be confused with pure water. The gas presents itself only in the necessary quantity to produce a relatively persistent fine bubble. On the nose, the citrus character dominates, obfuscating the bitterness of the quinine. Freshness of lime and lemon being the predominant notes, and a herbal touch on second stage. On the palate, the earthy notes rise elegantly showing that the quinine doesn’t dominate but remains present.

Advice for use
A fairly eclectic and versatile tonic that can be used to mix an almost limitless number of Gins. Ideal for minimalist concoctions, helping the Gin to shine.

Tips & Tricks
Fentimans

Origin England
Type Neutral

Brief description
It all began with a loan, whose guarantee was a recipe for Ginger Beer, over a hundred years ago. As the loan was never repaid, Thomas Fentiman began to produce Ginger Beer following that recipe, by fermenting botanicals. Its success was immediate and it didn’t take long for the whole family to join the business. Time moved on and with it came new products, like Ginger Ale and Tonic Water, but the methods of production never changed.
Opening a bottle of Fentimans is like opening the door on a citrus orchard on a beautiful hot day. Full of life with a strong aroma of lemon and and lemon grass, with warm notes, it is impossible to remain indifferent. The method of production, the fermentation of the botanical, guarantees a greater intensity of flavour and a little alcohol, although it’s less than 0,5%. Another differentiating factor is the low level quinine resulting in a more herbal and, of course, citrus aroma.
The Fentimans bottles, whose shape is common to all it products, are easily recognizable with their cylindrical shape and long neck where “Fearless” appears, Thoman Fentiman’s faithful dog, are reminiscent of old English beer bottles. The tonic water bottle is green and can be found in 125ml, ideal for a G&T 1:2, and 200ml for the traditional G&T mix.

Advice for use
Ideal for accentuating the citrus character of a Gin or for conferring some citrus on a drier or fruitier Gin. Combining it with American Dry makes for guaranteed success.

Tips & Tricks
Fever Tree Mediterranean

Origin England
Type Neutral

Brief Description
Fever Tree Mediterranean is, as the name tells us, a tonic inspired by the Mediterranean. The English company created this tonic with Vodka Tonic drinkers in mind but Fever Tree Mediterranean has found a life beyond Vodka and today is a reference in the world of the Gin and Tonic.
Having been created as a mixer for Vodka, Mediterranean is lighter in all aspects. It obviously has quinine mas less than usual which makes it a subtler ingredient. The citrus notes that punctuate almost all tonic waters is also less evident, top billing going instead to its more herbal side, with lemon thyme and rosemary under the spotlights.
It’s only in the carbonation that Fever Tree Mediterranean is the same as its sibling, Indian. With a fine bubble and controlled intensity, the carbonation remains for longer and makes Fever Tree Mediterranean one of the freshest and smoothest tonics on the market.
To go the name of the sea, Mediterranean’s label is blue.  On the neck, also with a blue background, the brand’s fever tree, as the Quina tree became known. Similarly to the Indian version, it’s available in 200ml and 500ml bottles.

Advice for use
Fever Tree Mediterranean is a versatile tonic, making for great results with the vast majority of Gins.

Tips & Tricks
1724

Origin Chile
Type Neutral

Brief Description
1724 tonic water owes its name to the altitude at which its quinine is harvested. In the Andes, on the ancient Inca Trail, is the place where it all began. It was where quinine was first discovered and where began the odyssey which centuries later resulted in the invention of tonic water. No other place could ever translate so well the authenticity of the key ingredient of all tonic waters.
1724 was created to meet the ever more demanding spirits market. It was thus that it was developed to show all the best qualities of the drink it accompanies and that is why it is gentler and more delicate than most tonic waters. It has a low quinine level which makes it slightly sweeter. For the record, 1724 has no more sweetening ingredients than other tonics, it just seems that way.
1724 also has less gas when compared to more commercial tonic waters. With a fine bubble, reminiscent of Champagne, the carbonation is always present but never overwhelms. 1724 is also gentle in its mixture of flavouring botanicals. Here there are citrus fruits that are warm and delicate, that remind us of oranges and tangerines.

Advice for use
1724 is a neutral tonic and for that reason it is very versatile. However, being a rather subtle tonic, avoid using it to mix with very strongly flavoured Gins.

Tips & Tricks
Fever Tree Indian

Origin England
Type Neutral

Brief Description
Charles Rolls and Tim Warrilow are the founders of Fever Tree, a tonic which is still in its youth, at ten years old since its first bottling. Disappointed with what was on offer at the time, they started out on an adventure to create a new tonic made only from natural ingredients. Between days spent reading in the British Library, journeys to remote parts of Africa, and a final test of 5 recipes, they arrived at what, today, is considered the benchmark of tonic waters, Fever Tree. Fever Tree Indian can be bought in traditional 200ml tonic water bottles or in larger 500ml ones. On the label, on the neck and even the lid appears the fever tree from which tonic water’s essential ingredient, quinine, is derived.
Elegance is the word that sums up Fever Tree Indian. Elegance while it is served; transparent, smooth and with a fine, delicate bubble. Elegance on the nose with that difficult balance between the natural bitterness of quinine and the sweetness of the citrus fruits. Elegance in the mouth, with the warm notes of orange and grapefruit that give way to the drier taste of the quinine. Elegance in the carbonation which, while always present, is limited to a minimum, maybe because of this it is slightly sweet.

Advice for use
Versatility is its middle name. Fever Tree Indian is the ideal mixer for most Gins. Avoid only combining it with sweeter Gins.

Tips & Tricks
Schweppes Original Tonic

Origin Switzerland (the first unit was built in England)
Type Neutral

Brief Description
You have to go back to the eighteenth century to tell the Schweppes tonic water story, or the tonic water as we know it. Jacob Schweppe was a jeweler and scientist by vocation. In 1783, he discovered how to produce carbonated water on a commercial scale. The tonic was born a century later - in 1870 - with the addition of higher carbon dioxide content - the brand signature that lingers to this day - and quinine.
The gas is still very present in the Schweppes Original Premium and throughout the remaining range, and appears in the form of large and lively bubbles. It is a tonic which balances harmoniously the sweet of sugar with the acidity and freshness of citric acid and bitter quinine, using only natural source ingredients. It is extremely fresh with lime notes. This freshness is transported to the Gin & Tonic, where Schweppes will always co-star and not merely supplement.
The Schweppes premium bottles recover the original shape of the brand with round bottom. This was ingeniously found to always maintain contact between water and stopper preventing the gas to be lost, as the bottles had never kept standing.

Advice for use
It is one of the most versatile tonic waters on the market but its liveliness (lots of freshness and gas) can overshadow softer Gin aromas.

Tips & Tricks
Schweppes Pink Pepper

Origin Spain
Type Flavored

Brief Description
Jacob Schweppe - a watchmaker and German chemist living in Switzerland - will forever be linked to the history of soft drinks. In the late eighteenth century, he produced carbonated mineral water artificially, now known as Soda. In the nineteenth century, with the company producing in the United Kingdom, the first lime soda with gas was created. The Schweppes tonic water was born shortly after in 1870, with the introduction of quinine on the recipe.
But adding artificial gas to the mineral water was only half the challenge. The problem was keeping it. The Schweppes bottle - now recovered - appears as the true stroke of genius: its round bottom meant that the bottles were always tumbled and thus the stopper remained moist. This ensured airtightness and maintenance of gas.
The Schweppes tonic water new range was launched in the twenty-first century, with the Pink Pepper became one of the flavored waters most implemented on the market.
The pink pepper flavor comes out ahead and the quinine and citrus component are not noticed on the nose. The flavor of pink pepper is also the first thing felt on the mouth but gives way to the citric taste of lemon-lime and to dry aftertaste of quinine. As for the gas, this is immediately noticeable when poured on a glass or drank. Carbonation is very present and lasts, maintaining the freshness of the Gin and Tonic from the first to the last sip.

Advice for use
Tonic water pink pepper aroma will intensify Gin giving it more spicy and lasting notes. Combine it with London Dry or fruity Gins. 

Tips & Tricks
Schweppes Hibiscus

Origin Spain
Type Flavored

Brief Description
Tonic water has been successful since its beginning, largely due to its prophylactic use against malaria. It became Britain's non-alcoholic favourite drink and Gin's favourite supplement. Quinine's growing demand and scarcity of natural sources , aggravated by the destruction of crops during World War II, led to the research and use of artificial solutions. The premium line was launched in the twenty-first century and returns to the old recipes and natural sources, either of quinine or sweetener.
Schweppes range of premium mixers is identified by the iconic bottle and a color code that distinguishes its different flavors. Schweppes Original, Pink Pepper, Ginger and Cardamom and Orange Blossom and Lavender. Now it's time for the Schweppes Hibiscus. It is also the first tonic water with color - a shade of pink made by a hibiscus flower infusion.
The Schweppes Hibiscus is distinguished from other tonic waters for its pinkish hue from the hibiscus flower. Its aroma is also more floral and fruity than other neutral tonics. On the nose, it is the sweet and floral aroma that stands out. In the mouth, the scent of hibiscus flower is the first to kick evolving into a more citric and dry aftertaste. This makes it the perfect mixer for a fresh and distinctly fruity Gin and Tonic.

Advice for use
The Schweppes Hibiscus floral and fruity notes add new flavors to dry Gins making them more round and smooth. 

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